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JavaTalk
Installation Instructions:

Since JavaTalk is a client/server applet, there are two things one must do to install JavaTalk on a server (a Server installation and a Client installation).

Server Installation:
The server installation consists of the following files:
  • JavaTalkServer.class (the main server file)
  • ConnectionInfo.class
  • Broadcast.class
  • ServerThread.class
  • SyncroStack.class
  • beep.au (the audio file for paging a user while in the chat)

Simply copy these files into a directory on your server and using a Java interpreter, execute the JavaTalkServer.class file passing it a single parameter. The parameter specifies the port where JavaTalkServer should listen for connections from clients (the same port number will be specified as a parameter on the client side applet).

Note: Make sure you transfer the files to the server in binary format (this may specified in the FTP program you are using to do the transfer). Also, since Java is case sensitive, make sure the case of the file names are consistent with the file names above.

Client Installation:
The client installation consists of the following class file:

  • JavaTalk.class (the applet the client loads with his/her browser)

To set up the web page for the client, simply insert the following HTML code on the webpage in which you would like the chat applet to appear. You may also adjust the width and height of the applet to suit your needs -- 415x300 seems to fit nicely though.

<applet code="JavaTalk.class" width="415" height="300">
<param name="port" value="1100">
</applet>

Note: If you choose to put the class file on another directory on your web server, you must use the codebase attribute of the applet tag or specify the relative location on the code attribute. Also, you must specify the same port number you started the server with.
Java Interpreter

Java is an interpreted language. When a Java program is compiled, it is compiled into what is referred to as "byte codes". Think of byte codes as a special compressed format that needs to be read by something that understands what the byte codes are.

Normal programs compiled with C or C++, are compiled into the machine language of the machine they were compiled on. That is why you can simply load a program by just typing the filename and executing it. Unlike machine language, Java programs must be read in by an interpreter (a program that understands how to read and process java byte codes and then translate those byte codes into the machine language it is running on), and then run the Java program. This is the reason why Java is cross-platform. You can copy the Java applet or application to another computer and execute it with an interpreter for that particular computer and it should run exactly the same.

You need a Java interpreter for your machine in order to execute any Java programs. Sun Microsystems distributes a Java Development Kit for free on the web. The Java Development Kit, among other programs such as Java compilers, has a Java interpreter as well. You can download the latest Java Development Kit (JDK for short) from http://www.javasoft.com.

Once you installed the JDK, you should be able to run the JavaTalkServer.class file by using the interpreter from that kit.


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