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JavaTalk
  1. I love the JavaTalk, are there any requirements?

    Since Java 1.02 specifications limit the capabilities of applets and only allow them to connect and read files from the server hosting the applets, it is important the JavaTalk server is launched on the same server hosting the web site displaying the JavaTalk client.

    You must have a Java Interpreter for launching the server portion of the JavaTalk. For instructions visit the usage section of the JavaTalk.

  2. I don't understand client and server. What is that and how does it relate to JavaTalk?

    Chat applets have a stronger requirement than regular java applets -- this is mainly due to the client-server nature of the software. In simple terms, there are two pieces of software in a client-server scenario - the client...and the server. The client is the piece of software that is loaded by each individual's browser -- this is the initial screen you see and will use to communicate. The second piece, the server, keeps track of all the various connections and manages the delivery of the communications between users.

    When you visit a web page with a chat, you will load the client. During inialization of client, the client will connect to the server and report your username so other clients who are connected can see your username and communicate with you. When you send a message through the client, the client delivers the message to the server and the server, in turn, delivers the message to all the connected clients:

  3. I installed the chat but keep on getting the message "Failed to connect to Server". What do I do?

    Congratulations, you have successfully installed the client portion of the JavaTalk. The only part you have to do now is make sure the Server part is properly installed and running.

    If you are a running the chat on a server that is within reach, then you can install a java interpreter to launch the server. In order to launch the server you will need the following files to be located in the same directory and with the same spelling (case sensitive):

    JavaTalkServer.class (the main server file)
    ConnectionInfo.class
    Broadcast.class
    ServerThread.class
    SyncroStack.class
    beep.au (the audio file for paging a user while in the chat)

    With these files installed, load the JavaTalkServer from the command prompt or terminal session using the following command:

    java JavaTalkServer 445

    java - the interpreter, availalbe from the JDK from www.javasoft.com.
    JavaTalkServer - the compiled Server class file to be executed
    445 - the port number to listen for connections. This number can change to suit your needs, but must be the same as the number specified in the client HTML code.

  4. What is a java interpreter?

    Java is an interpreted language. When a Java program is compiled, it is compiled into what is referred to as "byte codes". Think of byte codes as a special compressed format that can only be read by something that understands what the byte codes are.

    Normal programs compiled with C or C++, are compiled into the machine language of the machine they were compiled on. That is why you can simply load a program by just typing the filename and executing it. Unlike machine language, Java programs must be read in by an interpreter (a program that understands how to read and process java byte codes and then translate those byte codes into the machine language it is running on), and then run the Java program. This is the reason why Java is cross-platform. You can copy the Java applet or application to another computer and execute it with an interpreter for that particular computer and it should run exactly the same.

    You need a Java interpreter for your machine in order to execute any Java programs. Sun Microsystems distributes a Java Development Kit for free on the web. The Java Development Kit, among other programs such as Java compilers, has a Java interpreter as well. You can download the latest Java Development Kit (JDK for short) from http://www.javasoft.com.

    Once you installed the JDK, you should be able to run the JavaTalkServer.class file by using the interpreter from that kit.

    In most cases, the interpreter is called java.exe and is located in the \jdk1.X\bin directory.


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